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January 29: STEM Game Night: Beta Play

Event Date: 
Thursday, January 29, 2015 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Meet game developers and play and test STEM games for students and adults. Give your input about what works and what you would like to see more of. This is a unique opportunity to play fun games with a serious purpose that you won’t find anywhere else!

Play and remix the elements of Rock, Paper, Scissors with E-line Media. What if one aspect or rule of a familiar game was changed? How would the game’s variables and each player’s objectives be affected? E-line Media will take you through the elements of game systems and the iterative design process as you work in teams to create ideas for games of your own. Learn how students in grades 5-12 can enter the National STEM Video Game Challenge, presented by the Smithsonian in partnership with the Joan Ganz Cooney Center and E-Line Media.
 
Jonathan Nardolilli will take you through several rounds of Farposhket, an engineering-themed card game that he is developing for Ideaventions. In this game which is part cooperative and part competitive, players add components to the machine a la dominoes, with each part converting energy from an input form to a desired output form. Bugs are introduced as the machine goes into testing and then require modifications to fix them. Each engineer tries to nudge the machine to meet his or her own design goals.   


Play and give feedback on the digital That Rock Paper Scissor Game! with Anthony Powell, owner and developer of Philosoplay. This game presents a new twist on the classic as you play as one of three characters with the objective of smashing into one player while avoiding the other. Players may also use “power ups,” such as invisibility, dashing and land mines, to give them a competitive edge. Learn about other surprises underway for the next iteration. 

Mattie Cohan, Associate General Counsel at the National Academy of Sciences and a game enthusiast, will host the evening’s game play and lead discussions about what works and what could be tweaked for the next versions of these novel games.
 
Admission is $10 ($7 for students) and includes pizza and light refreshments. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. Purchase tickets through Eventbrite.
 
Photo: Jonathan Nardolilli attended a game night at the museum earlier this year.
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