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HANDS-ON SCIENCE

On weekends, come to the Koshland Science Museum and experience hands-on activities led by museum volunteers. Build on the information you explore in the exhibits. Engage with the issues that affect you and your community. You can:

Hands-on activities are offered Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Hands-on science offerings may vary. These activities are included free with regular admission.

Test Your Memory

Test your short-term memory and ability to recall everyday objects. See how many objects you can remember after seeing them for a short period of time. Then, learn a few simple tips to help you improve your memory. Try the activity again and see if you can remember more items.

Before or after the activity, explore the Life Lab to investigate the science of healthy living and learn how your brain works.

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Feel the Energy

Did you know that the lifestyle of an average American produces 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year? That's equal to the weight of more than five African elephants! Of the 20 metric tons, eight metric tons result from electricity consumption. One way to reduce these carbon dioxide emissions is by increasing energy efficiency.

In this hands-on activity, learn why some light bulbs are more energy-efficient than others. Crank a simple generator to feel the amount of physical energy it takes to light an incandescent bulb. Then, compare this with the amount of energy it takes to light an LED bulb.

Before or after the activity, tour the Earth Lab: Degrees of Change and play the role of a policy maker to identify priorities, evaluate tradeoffs, and decide how to respond to climate change. Or, in the Lights at Night, zoom in on satellite data to see how energy use has changed over time.

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Age in 3 Minutes

Grow old in three minutes (or less)! Experience the physical and sensory changes to your eyesight and tactile sensitivity that occur during aging.

Then, experience even more of the vision, movement, and memory changes associated with aging in the Life Lab exhibit. Put yourself in the place of a digital avatar known as AGNES--a 75-year-old-woman--to experience how these capabilities change with age.

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